Once: Poems

Once Poems The incandescent poems in Once explore violence loss and recovery Invoking both the personal and the civic self they chart uncertain new beginnings in a shattered nation What emerges is both a poig

  • Title: Once: Poems
  • Author: Meghan O'Rourke
  • ISBN: 9780393080629
  • Page: 313
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The incandescent poems in Once explore violence, loss, and recovery Invoking both the personal and the civic self, they chart uncertain new beginnings in a shattered nation What emerges is both a poignant meditation on a daughter s relationship with her mother and a citizen s relationship to her country from Frontier At times, I felt sick, intoxicatedby BPA andThe incandescent poems in Once explore violence, loss, and recovery Invoking both the personal and the civic self, they chart uncertain new beginnings in a shattered nation What emerges is both a poignant meditation on a daughter s relationship with her mother and a citizen s relationship to her country from Frontier At times,I felt sick, intoxicatedby BPA and mercury.At other times I fasted and the starsstumbled clear from the vault.Up there, the universe stands around drunk.I hope the Lord is kind to us,for we engrave our every mistake .

    • Free Read [Self Help Book] ✓ Once: Poems - by Meghan O'Rourke è
      313 Meghan O'Rourke
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      Posted by:Meghan O'Rourke
      Published :2019-02-25T14:56:51+00:00

    About “Meghan O'Rourke

    • Meghan O'Rourke

      Meghan O Rourke is the author The Long Goodbye A Memoir Riverhead Books, 2011 , and the poetry collections Once W W Norton, 2011 and Halflife W W Norton, 2007 A former literary editor of Slate and poetry editor of The Paris Review, she has published essays and poems in The New Yorker, Poetry, The Kenyon Review, The Best American Poetry, and other venues She is the recipient of the 2008 May Sarton Award for Poetry from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences She splits her time between Brooklyn, NY, where she grew up, and Marfa, TX.

    964 thoughts on “Once: Poems

    • I absolutely adore her poetry - it's very raw and emotional. I very much want to read her memoir, The Long Goodbye, before I go into too much detail about the poetry. I can't imagine visiting the same experiences through two mediums because I don't think I'd be able to bear it. She does it beautifully in this collection, and I'm hoping that the earlier memoir that covers her mother's diagnosis, illness, and death is equally beautiful and affecting.


    • There's an atmospheric intensity to this collection that lingers even after the book is closed, and its impossible to say whether the wistfulness I'm left with now is hers or my own.


    • O’Rourke’s second poetry book is divided into 3 untitled sections, suggestive of before, during, and after. The collection opens with the title poem, “Once,” in which the narrator describes an idyllic childhood. It starts with:A girl ate icesin the red summer. Beesbuzzed among the hydrangea,The first 5 stanzas continue with summer, suggestive of long, slow, days. Then 2 stanzas for fall, followed by 2 stanzas for winter. In the final stanza, life changes drastically.When spring came, the [...]


    • O'Rourke is somehow a technician who manages to keep the machine feeling. I was dubious about appreciating this book, considering the foregrounding of certain themes, specifically the specificity of the speaker's grief. How can specificity go wrong in a poem or a collection of poems? Well, I was afraid that the book would invite too much reduction, where we're always tempted to think, "here is a poem about the poet losing her mother." Not that such a statement or sentiment is inherently wrong, b [...]


    • The poems in Once (which I'm still beginning to read, but wanted to post about while it's in my mind to do that) make me immediately and simply happy. The combination of austerity and structure with powerful feeling is rare. These poems know things--for me that is bedrock--but know without enforcing, only inviting---and that is the clear lake above. One of the strongest poets of the generation now coming into its own, O'Rourke's voice is both sure and fearless.


    • O'Rourke's poems in this book are very dreamlike and emotionally charged. Parts I and III seemed to be describing my world in a strangely familiar way. Part I seemed to be speaking of my childhood in a magical and almost personal way. In the same way Part III brought back the all to familiar feelings and emotions of caring for my mother in home hospice. It was so validating and freeing to read such a poetic and beautiful account of this life altering experience.


    • I found this in a used bookstore's sidewalk box in San Francisco and it is lovely. A dreamy and melancholy collection.



    • Meghan O'Rourke's Once travels backwards and forwards, making much of the possibility of a forgotten past and all the possible futures the world could have. The subtle changes over time emerge as cracked lights and darker skies while the bigger changes lurk beneath, following the death of a mother figure. The focus changes with each poem between the literal and the figurative with some heavy-handed nature metaphors. Some poems speak to each other like "My Life As A Ruler" being the adult respons [...]


    • Just discovered this poet; this book resonates, it is about mothers and daughters, and I am a daughter, and my mother is fading from me in a different way, but i can feel it. the poet writes about very tangible things as someone is dying, a machine that administers morphine boluses, a noisy oxygen machine (which are never quiet, i think they must be loud to remind people to keep breathing); an inventory of belongings modeled on an inventory of grief. she also writes about the intangibles: "i don [...]


    • I found some poems repetitive, and also sometimes the pronouns felt distancing. The center section slipped too far into abstraction for me, especially after the searing personal details of the first section. Some of my favorite moments:“The shelf of snowis loosening on the roof.”“not a metaphor at allthat disease.”“On TV a hurricane beats a boat.”“The sky above your headblue, lacerated, clear.”






    • Once is an excellent book of poetry. I think my favorite of all the poems is Seven Months Later. It speaks to me because I can totally relate to the words and meaning.





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