Something in the World Called Love

Something in the World Called Love It s true there s something in the world called love Esma felt it when she moved into the house with the blue stairs There was Kara beside her and Simon below with his room that looked out to the ro

  • Title: Something in the World Called Love
  • Author: Sue Saliba
  • ISBN: 9780143008613
  • Page: 234
  • Format: Paperback
  • It s true, there s something in the world called love Esma felt it when she moved into the house with the blue stairs There was Kara beside her, and Simon below with his room that looked out to the road two roads actually so you had a choice as you were leaving or arriving, which way to take But anyway, Esma at the beginning saw only one wayWhen Esma moves into 22It s true, there s something in the world called love Esma felt it when she moved into the house with the blue stairs There was Kara beside her, and Simon below with his room that looked out to the road two roads actually so you had a choice as you were leaving or arriving, which way to take But anyway, Esma at the beginning saw only one wayWhen Esma moves into 22 Starling Street, she knows she s come to the right place A place to become someone new A place to belong.As the seasons change, she finds herself falling deeper and deeper in love But not in the way she expects.A remarkable new novel about friendship, trust and hope and what it means to love.

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      Posted by:Sue Saliba
      Published :2019-04-14T17:37:54+00:00

    About “Sue Saliba

    • Sue Saliba

      I grew up in the western suburbs of Melbourne, first in an outer suburb with the skeletons of new houses and paddocks of thistles, unmade roads and secret caves by the Maribyrnong River Later, when I was a teenager, we moved to Footscray which was not yet fashionable and seemed to me to be full of asphalt and traffic and hotels filled with old men I spent a lot of time yearning to go back to my childhood home.One connection I did keep was my school I travelled there each day by bus and although the school itself was not particularly special, I was blessed with having wonderfully supportive and inspiring English teachers.Later on, I ended up becoming an English teacher myself and spent a few years at a secondary school before I left to study Creative Writing at RMIT It was at RMIT that I began to think back to the world of my early childhood home and I wrote my first novel, Watching Seagulls.It was also during this time that I was fortunate enough to hear the Dalai Lama speak I remember being struck briefly by a feeling of connection with everything and everyone that I d never experienced before It was as if fear disappeared and the world became fully dimensional and a place of curiosity and deep interest and playfulness I couldn t help but pursue my sudden interest in Buddhism and, partly for this reason and partly because of my own restlessness, I headed off to Thailand.I lived there for about 18 months, in a town east of Bangkok where I found a job teaching English and spent my spare time exploring my new unfamiliar world and beginning my next novel, Imago As it turned out, Imago ended up being a love story it was really about obsessive love and the sometimes delusional nature of love and it was set in a small town in Thailand.I worked on the novel on my own for a while but, at last, back in Melbourne, I decided to join the Creative Writing Masters program at Melbourne University to help me develop it Once again, I found myself teaching this time Creative Writing to undergraduate students which was a good precursor for the most challenging of my teaching roles I was about to take on Novel Writing at RMIT Now, back where I d written my first novel and surrounded by talented and stimulating writers I reflected on my earlier time as a student and I wrote something in the world called love These days I live at Phillip Island with my husband, Bruno, and my much adored canine and feline companions, Min, Sally and Charbon We re incredibly fortunate to be surrounded by amazing and beautiful animals My appreciation of nature and our precious environment has certainly heightened in the last few years I ve become extremely passionate about animals, their rights and our relationship to them both ecologically and spiritually These have been some of the dominant thoughts and feelings that have filled me as I ve written my latest novel, alaska.

    152 thoughts on “Something in the World Called Love

    • I'm a girl that quite fancies "whimsy", which is precisely why my toenails are currently painted pale champagne pink. Something in the World Called Love though, might be so whimsical that without any true gravitas or darkness to weigh it down, it runs the risk of floating away… right over my head and my memory. Right over its literary merit and message. Into the whimsical land of handmade blueberry jams tied with cloth bows and girls with bangs Of No Return.Here is a simple test of whether thi [...]


    • 4.5★sSomething in the World Called Love won the 2009 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for Young Adult Fiction, and I was intrigued to read it because the author lives at Phillip Island, which is a total cultural desert IMHO. (I only survived there 18 months myself, and was deeply relieved to escape its utter dreariness in late 2014.)The story concerns the evolution of Esma, a young woman just starting life at university after leaving her dysfunctional family and dull home town. She joins a [...]


    • Going into this book, I had already read Alaska, so I knew what I was getting intoor at least I thought I did. I'm not sure how this is even possible, but it was even worse than I thought it would be. Disappointed.


    • This was a gentle easy read that evoked for me those early years at university when you're feeling your way in the world and trying to work out who you are and who you believe in. It also had the added advantage that it's set in Melbourne and was therefore deliciously familiar.




    • I love this book. The vulnerability and sensibility of the girl who changes with winter's wind is exquisitely wrought.


    • I loved the metaphors and similes but it seriously was just a fairy tale. I think the author was trying too hard to make it poetic. Sorry Sue.



    • It took me almost half the book to get into this but eventually I cam on board and I quite liked it. Very gentle and subtle.


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