Great Mambo Chicken And The Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly Over The Edge

Great Mambo Chicken And The Transhuman Condition Science Slightly Over The Edge Enter the gray area between overheated imagination and overheated reality and meet a network of scientists bent on creating artificial life forms building time machines hatching plans for dismantli

  • Title: Great Mambo Chicken And The Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly Over The Edge
  • Author: Ed Regis
  • ISBN: 9780201567519
  • Page: 287
  • Format: Paperback
  • Enter the gray area between overheated imagination and overheated reality, and meet a network of scientists bent on creating artificial life forms, building time machines, hatching plans for dismantling the sun, enclosing the solar system in a cosmic eggshell, and faxing human minds to the far side of the galaxy With Ed Regis as your guide, walk the fine line between scieEnter the gray area between overheated imagination and overheated reality, and meet a network of scientists bent on creating artificial life forms, building time machines, hatching plans for dismantling the sun, enclosing the solar system in a cosmic eggshell, and faxing human minds to the far side of the galaxy With Ed Regis as your guide, walk the fine line between science fact and fiction on this freewheeling and riotously funny tour through some of the most serious science there is.

    • ☆ Great Mambo Chicken And The Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly Over The Edge || Î PDF Read by ☆ Ed Regis
      287 Ed Regis
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Great Mambo Chicken And The Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly Over The Edge || Î PDF Read by ☆ Ed Regis
      Posted by:Ed Regis
      Published :2019-03-04T19:19:42+00:00

    About “Ed Regis

    • Ed Regis

      Ed Regis holds a Ph.D in philosophy from New York University and taught for many years at Howard University He is now a full time science writer, contributing to Scientific American, Harper s Magazine, Wired, Discover, and The New York Times, among other periodicals.

    454 thoughts on “Great Mambo Chicken And The Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly Over The Edge

    • I got depressed to tears reading Bill McKibben's Enough: Staying Human in an Engineered Age as part of my second brief and aborted posthumanism kick. In the interest of saving what remains of my sanity I put McKibben's book down and went in for something that approached post/trans-humanism with what I hoped was a lighter touch.Luckily for me, Ed Regis' Great Mambo Chicken and the Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly Over the Edge fit the bill. It approaches fin-de-millennium technoscientific h [...]


    • A funny introduction to why being merely human just isn't enough (broadly, transhumanism), and a reminder that serious science (and scientists) always seem crazy at the edges.Read for the sections on Drexler (nanotechnology), Moravec (uploading consciousness) and Alcor (cryogenics), and all the bits about stellar engineering and travel.


    • My friend recommended this bookd I was sceptical. But it was absolutely worth the read, if only to hear about scientists severing their dead grandmothers' heads.


    • "Should we give one party per galaxy? Or one on the far side of the Virgo cluster? How many centuries should we party? How much bean dip will we need?"Any book that presents a group of people having fun whilst doing unspeakable acts of Learning Stuff and Performing Science is a good book in my book.This has to be one of the most interesting, entertaining and weirdest science books I've ever read. And I enjoyed reading it so much.Great Mambo Chicken and the Transhuman Condition is, ostensibly, ab [...]


    • Here’s a thought: the problem with teaching non-fiction in schools is that as a culture we value story, even it its most cliched forms, over memorization. The great wave of edutainment hitting us now is trying to meet this need, merging story (the “Mario” adventure, in a nutshell, is a fairy tale in which it is man, or plumber as the case may be, vs. nature, albeit a very twisted view of nature, to rescue his true love) with facts. While the grooters are tied to the tube wonking on flying [...]


    • Holy crap but there are some weird folks out there doing some weird science - and this book chronicles some real doozies. I found myself chuckling at a lot of it - the poor chickens stuck in the centrifuge (simulating a monster gravity environment) for months who come out looking like steroid-enhanced body builders (Great Mambo Chicken!) was one such example. The fellow who wanted to download his consciousness into several hundred "Bush-Robot" bodies (so-called because they look like a big bush [...]


    • 2007/04 - bought. Started 6 Oct 2008; finished 19 Oct 2008The book starts with a discussion of cryonics & nanotech & meanders through a series of related topics, while staying mostly focused on the idea of "the transhuman condition" - whether thru cryonics, space colonies or artificial intelligence. Not quite as humorous as I had expected from the title; more on the philisophical side , but an intriguing read.


    • Man, remember when gene-editing, space travel, and ultra-realistic computer simulations seemed right around the corner? And then nothing happened for like two decades, and then it all came true?Relive the glory days of the 60s through 80s, when people were still wildly optimistic about the transformative impact of technology. (Note that lots of the people and projects were dead ends, but many of the basic ideas are now reality.)


    • The book shows it's age a lot. Everyone has heard about cryonics and avatars nowadays. And for people who are a bit more interested in the future of humanity, no concept in this book will be new.That said, it is a nice indicator, that we actually did make some progress in the past 20 years. And while the title overpromises on the fun factor of this book, it is still a more humorous introduction to transhumanism than fighting through Kurzweil's diagrams


    • Wasn't the best idea to read this book on an airplane, especially the section was a little disturbing which related to the otherwise hilarious rocket experiments - all in all it's a very entertaining book about crazy - but also very interesting - inventors and their experiments, transhumanist approaches and theories.


    • A hilarious look at the ideas and people on the "cutting edge" of science - that edge has been pushed back somewhat in the 25 years since this was released, and some of the ideas discussed have since collapsed under their own weight, but there are still ideas and proposals in this book that scientists are working toward every day.


    • I read this one about 10 or 15 years ago. It gave me hope that there were other scientists out there trying to benefit and advance the human condition. With the decommissioning of the space shuttle and the lack of any form of space colony after more than 50 years of space flight, I'm beginning to doubt that it will ever be more than a dream to a few scientists labeled by society as whack jobs.


    • I liked the topics, but that's pretty much it. The book neither went into depth technically (which is fine), nor into depth analyzing the people it discusses. It just recounts stories superficially. It's 'people have hubris but can back it up with science, awesome! ' theme gets very redundant.


    • Learn how to peel your brain, layer by layer, like an onion, and reconstruct it inside another vessel. But when you make it there are you still you? Does it really matter if you don't know the difference?


    • this was excellent little bits of information on multiple areas of science (or science-almost-fiction). it left me wanting to know more, which isn't necessarily a bad thing, but I feel like a narrower focus and more depth might have been better?


    • An entertaining jaunt along the boundary between science fiction and science possibility, and an introduction to some really interesting people developing even more interesting, even outlandish, ideas.The author is a little too fond of the term "hubris", even if he might be, well, right.


    • A good general overview of the beginnings of the Transhumanist movement and its beginings in cryonics . Though by today's standards the book is very dated (written in 1992). The style is an approachable journalistic one , which it proves an easy read. That is somewhat lacking in sources.


    • This is out of date now ( 1990 ) The net has made this kind of book not very useful anymore ( but it would have been in 90 )


    • a fascinating and very humorous description of so called advanced thinkers, better known as kooks. you have to read it to believe what is out there.


    • Back in my nanotechnology phase, when I actually believed in the new human race, before I gave up all hope on everything.


    • Hilarious. Vignettes about half-baked, sci-fi plans and inventions and the crackpots behind them.Hard to find in print. Check the used books sold through .


    • I read this book a number of years ago now (too many to think about, really) but loved how it explored concepts that were then on the fringes of extreme science. Yay extreme science!





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